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article thumbnailLaser treatment for glaucoma (PI / SLT)

Laser treatment for glaucoma is used in a variety of ways. Laser can be used for angle closure, when it is applied to form a tiny opening...
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article thumbnailMr PH Galloway, MBBS, FRCOphth

Mr Galloway is a Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon at St James University Hospital, Leeds. His major interests are glaucoma management, and...
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Glaucoma FAQ section
Home eye pressure measurement PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Sunday, 21 October 2012 18:40

The iCare tonometer is an excellent tool for monitoring IOP (eye pressure) at home, however it requires careful instruction and supervision by an ophthalmologist for its use. The icare ONE tonometer is designed and recommended for home use by Glaucoma Patients who need regular IOP monitoring by their ophthalmologists recommendation. The tonometer works using a technique called rebound tonometry. No anaesthetic is required for its use.

icare tonometer

Last Updated on Sunday, 21 October 2012 18:49
 
Glaucoma and magnesium PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Sunday, 21 October 2012 16:56

There is now evidence that magnesium is deficient in patients with glaucoma. In one Russian study, magnesium levels were found to be several fold lower. In normal subjects, levels were found to be about 180 mg/L whereas in glaucoma patients levels were around 18 mg/L. The role of magnesium supplementation is yet to be evaluated in detail; there is some concern about the toxicity of magnesium in patients with renal complaints. Magnesium deficiency may play a role in glaucoma by impairing mitochondrial function and activating NMDA receptors. One epidemiological study based on a dietary survey however has linked a higher intake of magnesium with an increased risk of glaucoma, so the data is quite hard to interpret really. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22461101

Magnesium is found naturally in green vegetables including spinach, nuts and whole grains. It helps the release of energy from food, and is important in the development of healthy bones, nerves and muscles. A typical adult male requires about 400mg of magnesium a day, and an adult female around 300mg daily.

Severe magnesium deficiencies are infact rare. They are more likely in those who have Crohn's disease and kidney disease, also in those who abuse alcohol.

 

Glaucoma and magnesium

Last Updated on Sunday, 21 October 2012 19:01
 
Advice following eye surgery PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 07 December 2011 21:51

Discharge advice following glaucoma surgery (Mr Galloway patients)

The morning after surgery: wash your hands, remove shield, bathe eyelids with boiled, cooled water and cotton pads. Use new piece with each wipe. Wear eye shield for 7 nights. No heavy lifting for 2 weeks. A gritty or somewhat sharp feeling may be present in the days following surgery. This is normal, and can reflect a surface dryness or be due to some sutures. Sutures are often "dissolving", but can work their way loose. If, however, any significant eye ache develops, seek advice immediately.

DO NOT RUB YOUR EYE AT ANY STAGE FOLLOWING SURGERY

You may wear dark glasses if bright lights are uncomfortable.

Advice sheet glaucoma

Glaucoma valve


Last Updated on Monday, 07 October 2013 10:08
 
Directions to Spire Hospital in Hull PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 10 November 2011 23:30

How to find Spire Hull and East Riding Hospital


By car

From the west
Take the M62 which continues into the A63. Take the exit signed Humber Bridge, then go straight acrossthe first two roundabouts onto the A1105, signposted Hospital - Hyperbaric Unit. At the next roundabout turn left to Anlaby on the B1232, take the right fork at the mini-roundabout and the hospital is on the left.

Lowfield Road, Anlaby,
East Yorkshire
HU10 7AZ

From the Humber Bridge
Turn right at the first roundabout onto the A1105, signposted Hospital - Hyperbaric Unit. Turn left at the next roundabout into Anlaby on the B1232. Take the right fork at the mini-roundabout and the hospital is on the left.

From Hull city centre
Follow the Anlaby Road A1105 from the centre of town until it forks. Take the left fork and continue along the A1105, which changes to Boothferry Road, following the signs for the Humber Bridge. Turn right towards Anlaby on the B1232, signposted Hospital - Hyperbaric Unit. Take the right fork at the mini-roundabout and the hospital is on the left.

From Beverley
Take the A164 towards the Humber Bridge. At the roundabout by the Bridge take a left turn onto A1105 signposted Hospital - Hyperbaric Unit. At the next roundabout turn left to Anlaby on the B1232, take the right fork at the mini roundabout and the hospital is on the left.

By rail

The nearest mainline station is Hull Central, which is a 10-15 taxi or bus ride from the hospital.

By bus

The 152 bus service stops outside the hospital and runs from the main bus station, adjoining the railway station.

If you need further help to find the hospital, call us on 01482 659 471

spire hull

Spire Hospital Hull

Last Updated on Wednesday, 09 October 2013 14:01
 
Raising money for the IGA charity PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Sunday, 04 September 2011 15:23

For donations, please visit the JustGiving page:

http://www.justgiving.com/glaucoma

 
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